Funded Projects

Project # Project Title Sort descending Research Focus Area Research Program Administering IC(s) Institution(s) Investigator(s) Location(s) Year Awarded
1UG3DA050251-01
A digital intervention to prevent the initiation of opioid misuse in adolescents in school-based health centers New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Yale University Fiellin, Lynn E. New Haven, CT 2019
FOA Title: HEAL Initiative: Preventing Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16–30) (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required
FOA Number: RFA-DA-19-035
Summary:

Most opioid misuse begins during adolescence and young adulthood. Adolescence is the best time for prevention interventions in settings like school-based health centers (HCs), yet few programs focus on preventing initiation of opioid misuse. This study harnesses the power of video game interventions and incorporates components of effective substance use prevention programs to develop an evidence-informed intervention to prevent the initiation of opioid misuse in adolescents. In partnership with the national School-Based Health Alliance (SBHA), researchers will develop and test a new video game intervention, PlaySmart. It will build on our previous video game intervention that has demonstrated efficacy in improving attitudes and knowledge related to risk behaviors. The study will evaluate the game in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) in 10 school-based HCs and examine strategies for implementing PlaySmart in school-based HCs nationally. This research has considerable potential for wide implementation, reach, and impact on high-risk adolescents through school-based HCs.

3P50MH113662-01A1S1
Accelerator Strategies for States to Improve System Transformations Affecting Children Youth and Families New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIMH NYU School of Medicine Hoagwood, Kimberly; McKay, Mary New York, NY 2019
FOA Title: Advanced Laboratories for Accelerating the Reach and Impact of Treatments for Youth and Adults with Mental Illness (ALACRITY) Research Centers (P50 Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PAR-18-701
3R01AA025848-03S1
AOD Use Trajectories from Age 10 to 24: Multi-level Predictors, Health and Behavioral Functioning, and Racial/ethnic Disparitie New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIAAA RAND Corporation D'Amico, Elizabeth J. Santa Monica, CA 2019
FOA Title: Administrative Supplements to Existing NIH Grants and Cooperative Agreements (Parent Admin Supp Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PA-18-591
Summary:

There is a great deal of research aimed at better understanding transitions in alcohol and other drug (AOD) use patterns from early to late adolescence and from late adolescence to emerging adulthood. However, no studies to date have (a) assessments of AOD use from ages 10 to 24 across all developmental periods (middle school, high school, and emerging adulthood); (b) a large sample with substantial racial and ethnic diversity, particularly among Hispanic and Asian youth; (c) in-depth coverage of 10 areas of functioning across three key domains; (d) subjective and objective neighborhood data; or (e) the capacity to examine developmental trajectories for more than one substance. The current proposal is a continuation of previous projects that assessed AOD use across nine waves of data from age 10 to age 19. The proposed study capitalizes on the longitudinal data on protective and risk factors we have collected since age 10 in an ethnically diverse cohort by continuing to annually assess these youth in order to capture important transitions to emerging adulthood (through age 24). By advancing the epidemiology of alcohol use during adolescence and emerging adulthood, our findings can affect prevention and intervention programming for young people and address critical issues of public health policy.

3R01DA045396-02S1
Brief Individual and Parent Interventions for Marijuana Misuse in Truant Adolescents New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Brown University SPIRITO, ANTHONY Providence, RI 2019
FOA Title: Administrative Supplements to Existing NIH Grants and Cooperative Agreements (Parent Admin Supp Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PA-18-591
Summary:

Four out of five youth in the juvenile justice (JJ) system show evidence of being under the influence during their offenses, and more than half test positive for substances at the time of their arrest. Preventive intervention approaches that can be easily implemented within JJ settings may offer greater access to substance use care as well as increase families’ motivation to comply with court referrals to seek further services. It is especially important to evaluate interventions for court-involved, non-incarcerated (CINI) juveniles, as these youth account for two-thirds of those arrested; however, the bulk of extant research has been conducted with detained or incarcerated youth. In this application for supplemental funding, we capitalize on our parent grant (Brief Individual and Parent Interventions for Marijuana Misuse in Truant Adolescents) by proposing to develop an adjunctive, targeted preventive intervention for marijuana-using, JJ youth who are at elevated risk for illicit opioid use. The goal will be to develop a protocol for a single-session, parent-adolescent preventive intervention to decrease the likelihood of illicit opioid use in CINI adolescents. This formative work will culminate in a draft intervention manual.

3P50DA046351-02S1
Center to Advance Research Excellence (OPTIC) New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA RAND Corporation STEIN, BRADLEY Santa Monica, CA 2019
FOA Title: NIDA Research Center of Excellence Grant Program (P50)
FOA Number: PAR-16-009
Summary:

The U.S. is in the midst of an opioid crisis, and efforts to tackle the complex and dynamic nature of this public health challenge must comprehensively consider a multitude of contributing factors. In response, states have implemented a wide range of policies and initiatives. However, the dynamic nature of the crisis and the speed with which different policy approaches are being implemented pose numerous challenges for researchers evaluating the effects of such efforts. These challenges stem in part from limited information regarding policy implementation; insufficient information about policy characteristics that may influence effectiveness; little consideration of how the chosen analytic method may influence findings, given simultaneous or concurrent implementation of multiple policies; and limited training on how to best communicate findings to policymakers. To address these challenges, the proposed Center for Opioid Policy Research (COPR) will serve as a national resource, fostering innovative and high-quality research in the opioid policy arena and developing and disseminating methods, tools and information to the research community, policymakers and the public.

3K23DA045085-01S1
COLLABORATIVE CARE OFFICE-BASED OPIOID TREATMENT FOR ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Boston Medical Center HADLAND, SCOTT EVAN Boston, MA 2019
FOA Title: Administrative Supplements to Existing NIH Grants and Cooperative Agreements (Parent Admin Supp Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PA-18-591
Summary:

Risk for opioid use disorder (OUD) often begins in adolescence and young adulthood. Engaging and retaining adolescents and young adults (collectively, “youth”) in early, effective treatment is critical for improving the life course trajectory of addiction. For adults with OUD, office-based opioid treatment (OBOT) with a collaborative care approach that includes behavioral therapy optimizes patient engagement and retention in care. Collaborative care OBOT is especially promising for youth, who can receive treatment from a trusted primary care provider in the same familiar setting they receive their usual medical care. To date, however, OBOT has not been formally adapted for treating youth. The central objective of this project is to develop and pilot an enhanced OBOT model for youth that is developmentally appropriate and family centered. The multidisciplinary nature of our team, which includes expertise in advanced biostatistical analysis, qualitative research, intervention development, developmental psychology, and implementation and improvement science, will maximize the chances of filling an important gap in the provision of youth specific evidence-based OUD interventions.

1UG3DA050234-01
Community Randomized Trial in the Cherokee Nation: CONNECT and CMCA for Preventing Drug Misuse among Older Adolescents New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Emory University Komro, Kelli Ann Atlanta, GA 2019
FOA Title: HEAL Initiative: Preventing Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16–30) (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required
FOA Number: RFA-DA-19-035
Summary:

The national public health opioid crisis has disproportionately burdened rural white populations and American Indian populations. To address this crisis, the Cherokee Nation and Emory University public health scientists will carry out an opioid prevention trial to be conducted in at-risk rural communities in the Cherokee Nation (in northeast Oklahoma) with populations of white and American Indian adolescents and young adults. The study will expand and integrate two established intervention approaches, consisting of community organizing and universal school-based brief intervention and referral to further enhance their effects in preventing and reducing opioid misuse. These interventions, called CMCA and CONNECT, were originally designed to target adolescent alcohol use, but showed significant beneficial effects on use of other drugs, including prescription drug misuse. The expanded, integrated interventions will be tested in a community-randomized trial with the goal of new systems for sustained implementation within existing structures of the Cherokee Nation.

1U24DA050182-01
Coordinating Center to Support NIDA Preventing Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adolescents and Young Adults New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA RTI Institute Graham, Phillip W. (contact); Ridenour, Ty A. Research Triangle Park, NC 2019
FOA Title: HEAL Initiative: Coordinating Center to Support NIDA Preventing Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16–30) Initiative (U24 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
FOA Number: RFA-DA-19-034
Summary:

The Coordinating Center (CC) will provide centralized logistical support and facilitate communication and coordination of activities across the cooperative. The CC will provide scientific leadership, which will include providing scientific expertise in the areas of implementation research and economic evaluation. The CC will establish an infrastructure for cross-site data collection, management, harmonization, and data sharing and provide expert methodological and statistical consultation.

3R01DA044184-02S1
DEVELOPMENT & MALLEABILITY FROM CHILDHOOD TO ADULTHOOD New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Johns Hopkins University IALONGO, NICHOLAS S Baltimore, MD 2019
FOA Title: Administrative Supplements to Existing NIH Grants and Cooperative Agreements (Parent Admin Supp Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PA-18-591
Summary:

The Family School Partnership (FSP) and classroom-centered (CC) interventions targeted aggressive-coercive behavior and poor academic achievement as antecedents of the distal outcomes of antisocial behavior, substance abuse/dependence, psychiatric symptoms/disorders, high-risk sexual behavior and successful adaptation to the relevant developmental demands of the educational, work, romantic relationships and family (both family of procreation and origin/orientation) social fields/contexts. The participants of the FSP and CC original prevention trial were a population (n = 798) of urban, predominately African-American young adults, who began first grade in the fall of 1993 in nine elementary schools in predominantly low- to lower-middle-income Baltimore areas. The central purpose of the proposed study is to extend through ages 31-35 an examination of normal and pathogenic development and the impact of these two universal first-grade preventive interventions on the distal targets mentioned above. We will continue to study the role of phenotypic and genetic factors (and their interactions) as well as the impact of the interventions on the development and course of substance use/abuse/dependence, psychiatric symptoms/disorders, antisocial behavior/disorder and high-risk sexual behavior through young adulthood. The knowledge accrued over the course of the proposed assessments should serve to inform the nature, targets and timing of our future preventive intervention efforts.

3UH3DA050235-02S1
Development and Implementation of a Culturally Centered Opioid Prevention Intervention for American Indian/Alaska Native Young Adults in California New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA RAND CORPORATION D'AMICO, ELIZABETH Santa Monica, CA 2020
FOA Title: Notice of Special Interest(NOSI): HEAL Initiative: Social Network Analyses to Reduce American Indian and Alaska Native Opioid Use Disorder and Related Risks for Suicide and Mental Health Disorders
FOA Number: NOT-DA-20-033
Summary:

Data from 2015 show that American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have the highest rates of diagnosis for opioid use disorders (OUD) and deaths from drug overdose; yet, there are no prevention programs addressing opioid misuse among urban AI/AN young adults that integrate culturally-appropriate strategies with evidence-based treatment. This project proposes to address that gap and help prevent OUD in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16-30) by developing and implementing a culturally-centered intervention to address opioid misuse among urban AI/AN emerging adults in California. The study will examine outcomes at 3-, 6-, and 12- months, and explore potential mechanisms of change for decreases in opioid and alcohol and other drug use outcomes through mediation analyses, including changes in social networks and cultural connectedness. Results from this study could significantly advance scientific knowledge and clinical practice for AI/AN emerging adults.

1UG3DA050235-01
Development and Implementation of a Culturally Centered Opioid Prevention Intervention for American Indian/Alaska Native Young Adults in California New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA RAND Corporation D'amico, Elizabeth J. (contact); Dickerson, Daniel Lee Santa Monica, CA 2019
FOA Title: HEAL Initiative: Preventing Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16–30) (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required
FOA Number: RFA-DA-19-035
Summary:

Data from 2015 show that American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have the highest rates of diagnosis for opioid use disorder (OUD) and death from drug overdose. Of particular concern is the prevalence in emerging adults (ages 18-25), as this is a developmental period of heightened vulnerability and critical social, neurological, and psychological development. This study will develop and implement a culturally centered intervention to address opioid misuse among urban AI/AN emerging adults in California: POMANAYA (Preventing Opioid Misuse Among Native American Young Adults). POMANAYA will developed by adapting and enhancing our existing culturally sensitive prevention intervention program that uses motivational interviewing in AI/AN youth to address social network factors in emerging adults that amplify (or reduce) opioid and other drug use risk. Results from this study could significantly advance scientific knowledge and clinical practice for AI/AN emerging adults.

1UG3DA050252-01
Does Treating Young Persons Psychopathology Prevent the Onset of Opioid and other Substance Use Disorders? New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Massachussetts General Hospital Wilens, Timothy E. (contact); Yule, Amy Boston, MA 2019
FOA Title: HEAL Initiative: Preventing Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16–30) (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required
FOA Number: RFA-DA-19-035
Summary:

Despite psychopathology robustly increasing the risk for later substance use disorders (SUD), remarkably few studies have examined the impact of treating psychopathology on reducing rates of opioid use disorder (OUD), nicotine, and SUD. The main aims of this study are to implement a pragmatic set of office-based instrumentation using patient related outcome measures linked to electronic health records (EPIC) for intake and follow-up assessments to evaluate psychopathology, OUD, nicotine use disorder, and other SUDs in young people aged 16-30 years old who are receiving psychopathology treatment as part of routine outpatient clinical care. The study will also examine similar age patients with non-opioid SUD in outpatient SUD treatment settings to examine the impact of treatment in mitigating the development of OUD. Data derived from this study will help inform clinical guidelines and public health policy and provide important secondary outcomes for further work on the prevention of OUD, nicotine use disorder, and other SUDs in relation to early-onset psychopathology.

3R21DA045092-01A1S1
EVALUATING COGNITIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL RISK FACTORS FOR OPIOID MISUSE AMONG ADOLESCENT CANNABIS USERS New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA University of Washington RAMIREZ, JASON Seattle, WA 2019
FOA Title: Administrative Supplements to Existing NIH Grants and Cooperative Agreements (Parent Admin Supp Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PA-18-591
Summary:

The opioid epidemic continues unabated in the United States, and despite the rapid expansion of this crisis, the nature of the risk factors that contribute to opioid misuse remain poorly understood compared with other substances of abuse. The goal of this project is to examine cannabis use and cannabis identification measures as risk factors for opioid misuse while also developing and evaluating novel implicit measures of opioid associations as risk factors for opioid misuse among an at-risk sample of adolescents. Findings from the proposed research are intended to improve the prediction of opioid misuse among adolescents and to potentially identify novel targets for prevention and intervention strategies that aim to combat the opioid epidemic.

3R01DA045872-01A1S1
Examining the synergistic effects of cannabis and prescription opioid policies on chronic pain, opioid prescribing and opioid poisoning New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA New York University School of Medicine Cerda, Magdalena; Martins, Silvia Saboia New York, NY 2019
FOA Title: Public Policy Effects on Alcohol-, Marijuana-, and Other Substance-Related Behaviors and Outcomes (R01)
FOA Number: PA-17-135
Summary:

As states make unprecedented changes to prescription opioid (PO) policies and cannabis laws, the independent and synergistic contributions that both types of measures have on opioid-prescribing practices and opioid overdoses, with and without benzodiazepines (BZDs), are not known. This study will pursue this aim in the U.S. population and Medicaid patients with chronic pain, aiming to: (1) examine whether nonmedical use of POs, BZDs, and heroin and opioid- and BZD-use disorders decreased following enactment of more restrictive PO policies and less restrictive cannabis laws in 2004–2019; and (2) test whether Medicaid patients are less likely to have claims for opioid prescribing, clinic visits for chronic pain, and opioid overdoses following enactment of more restrictive PO policies and less restrictive cannabis laws in 2001–2019. This study will provide findings about the types of policies that are most likely to end the opioid epidemic.

3R01DA044778-02S1
EXTENSION OF RISK FOR PRESCRIPTION OPIOID MISUSE IN ADOLESCENTS WITH THE FULL AGE SPECTRUM OF ADOLESCENCE THROUGH EMERGING ADULTHOOD New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Oregon Health & Science University Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W.; Wilson, Anna Camille (contact) Portland, OR 2019
FOA Title: Administrative Supplements to Existing NIH Grants and Cooperative Agreements (Parent Admin Supp Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PA-18-591
Summary:

Current rates of prescription opioid misuse are rising to epidemic levels among adults. These rates may be even higher among adolescents and young adults (AYAs), who have elevated levels of substance exploration and misuse during this precise developmental period. AYAs who are exposed to opioids via legitimate prescriptions by age 18 are at increased risk for misuse after high school. However, there is a substantial gap in our knowledge of what factors might contribute to the development of misuse and related poor outcomes in these high-risk youth. Identifying factors that convey risk for increasing opioid use and problematic use would inform AYA models of opioid abuse and inform the development of preventive interventions to modify risk in medical settings, which are a unique point of entry into opioid use, and a key setting in which to examine AYA outcomes. We will use a developmental model of the impact of opioid exposure by legitimate prescription during late adolescence, with consideration for pain and psychological characteristics of the individual within the psychosocial (family, peer, educational and work context). Determining mechanisms and moderators of risk during this developmental transition will provide critical information for the design of interventions aimed at reducing opioid use disorders in at-risk AYA.

1R21DA049861-01
Impact of SB 273 on West Virginia Patients, Providers and Overall Prescription Rates of Opioid Medications New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA West Virginia University Cara Sedney; Treah Haggerty Morgantown, WV 2019
FOA Title: Mechanism for Time-Sensitive Drug Abuse Research (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PAR-19-064
Summary:

In 2018, new opiate prescribing limits (SB 273) were implemented across West Virginia to combat the opiate misuse epidemic. This study will utilize quantitative and qualitative measures to determine the effect of the recent opiate prescription laws in West Virginia, how a change in policy affects the opiate misuse epidemic, and how communities may apply this knowledge more broadly. The research team will: 1) collaborate with the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy to ascertain changes in opiate prescribing habits before and after the start of SB 273 using an interrupted time series methodology, and 2) achieve broad and deep understanding of how SB 273 has affected prescribing practices and experiences amongst primary care physicians, specialists (pan physicians, surgeons, emergency room physicians, etc.), and patients who currently or previously utilized opiate medications.

3R01DA041434-03S1
IMPROVING ACCESS TO SUBSTANCE ABUSE EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES FOR YOUTH IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM: STRATEGIES USED BY JPOS New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Oregon Social Learning Center, Inc. SHEIDOW, ASHLI J Eugene, OR 2019
FOA Title: Administrative Supplements to Existing NIH Grants and Cooperative Agreements (Parent Admin Supp Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PA-18-591
Summary:

Justice-involved young adults are one of the highest-risk populations for the development of opioid use disorder (OUD) and other significant public health problems, but they usually lack access to evidence-based practices that could potentially prevent this trajectory. The risk of unintentional death and other deleterious outcomes and long-term costs for opioid misuse for young adults, their communities and society (costs estimated at more than $115 billion annually) make this a priority, with rural areas in need of the most attention and assistance. The overriding purpose of the proposed pilot study is to prevent the onset of OUD by improving young adult offenders’ access to evidence-based risk reduction interventions, like contingency management (CM), by testing whether officers in the adult probation and parole setting can deliver such an intervention to their young adult substance using probationers who have not yet developed OUD. The primary motivation for this pilot is the clear public health need for improving and expanding delivery of substance use risk reduction interventions for young adults in the justice system. The ultimate outcome would be prevention of OUD in this high-risk population.

1R34DA050044-01
Improving health and employment outcomes through workplace opioid policies New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Washington University Dale, Anne Marie St. Louis, MO 2019
FOA Title: Pilot Health Services and Economic Research on the Treatment of Drug, Alcohol, and Tobacco Use Disorders (R34 Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PA-18-774
Summary:

This study will develop and test the feasibility of implementing guidelines on workplace policies to reduce prescription opioid use, decrease chronic opioid use, promote recovery from opioid use disorder, and improve health-related employment outcomes. The researchers will develop and test these guidelines among construction workers. This project will provide critical information to design and conduct a randomized trial to implement and evaluate insurance and employment policy guidelines among labor-management health funds in the building trades. Aim 1 will identify current best-practice health care and employment policies to prevent health and employment consequences of opioid use. Aim 2 will characterize the opioid problem in construction and adapt best-practice healthcare and employment policies to the unique needs of the construction industry. Aim 3 will evaluate the feasibility of implementing workplace opioid guidelines in the construction trades and will define and collect measures of implementation and effectiveness.

3R01DA001411-45S2
Monitoring the Future: Drug Use and Lifestyles of American Youth New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA University of Michigan at Ann Arbor Miech, Richard A. Ann Arbor, MI 2019
FOA Title: Research Project Grant (Parent R01)
FOA Number: PA-13-302
3U01AA021691-08S1
NATIONAL CONSORTIUM ON ALCOHOL AND NEURODEVELOPMENT IN ADOLESCENCE: OHSU New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIAAA Oregon Health & Science University NAGEL, BONNIE J Portland, OR 2019
FOA Title: Administrative Supplements to Existing NIH Grants and Cooperative Agreements (Parent Admin Supp Clinical Trial Optional)
FOA Number: PA-18-591
3S06GM128073-02S1
Native American Research Centers For Health (NARCH X) New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIGMS INDIAN HEALTH COUNCIL, INC. CALAC, DANIEL J. Valley Center, CA 2018
FOA Title: Native American Research Centers for Health (NARCH) (S06)
FOA Number: PAR-16-297
1UG3DA050173-01
Optimized Interventions to Prevent Opioid Use Disorder among Adolescents and Young Adults in the Emergency Department New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Univ of Michigan at Ann Arbor Bonar, Erin Elizabath; Walton, Maureen A. (contact) Ann Arbor, MI 2019
FOA Title: HEAL Initiative: Preventing Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16–30) (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required
FOA Number: RFA-DA-19-035
Summary:

The emergency department (ED) is an ideal venue to reach and intervene with adolescents and young adults (ages 16-30) at risk for opioid misuse, particularly as young adults may disconnect from primary care when transitioning out of pediatric medicine. This study will evaluate the efficacy of interventions of varying type/intensity to prevent/reduce opioid misuse or opioid use disorder (OUD). The research leverages technology that is appealing to youth to facilitate intervention delivery by health coaches. In this study, adolescents and young adults in the ED screening positive for opioid use or misuse will be randomly assigned to one of four intervention conditions with outcomes measured at 4, 8, and 12 months. Technology-driven, scalable interventions delivered via health coach allow for real-time tailoring to the rapidly changing opioid epidemic, with the potential for a sustainable impact on preventing escalation of opioid misuse among adolescents and young adults.

1UG3DA050250-01
Preventing Opioid Use Among Justice-Involved Youth as They Transition to Adulthood: Leveraging Safe Adults (LeSA) New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Texas Christian University Knight, Danica K. Fort Worth, TX 2019
FOA Title: HEAL Initiative: Preventing Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16–30) (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required
FOA Number: RFA-DA-19-035
Summary:

Juvenile justice (JJ)-involved youth represent a particularly vulnerable population for substance use and substance use disorders (SUDs), because they often experience mental health disorders, dysfunctional family/social relationships, and complex trauma. This study will adapt and test an intervention for preventing initiation and/or escalation of opioid misuse among older JJ-involved youth aging out of JJ (16-18 years), who are transitioning to their communities after a period of detainment in a secure treatment or correctional facility. Trust-Based Relational Intervention® (TBRI®, a relational, attachment-based intervention that promotes emotional regulation through interaction with responsive adults) will be adapted as a prevention intervention targeting youth at risk for substance use, especially non-medical use of opioids. Safe adults (e.g., parent/guardian) will be trained in behavior management techniques for empowering youth to appropriately express their needs, connecting them with others in pro-social ways, and correcting or reshaping undesirable behavior.

1UG3DA050193-01
Preventing Parental Opioid and/or Methamphetamine Addiction within DHS-Involved Families: FAIR New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA Oregon Social Learning Center, INC. Saldana, Lisa Eugene, OR 2019
FOA Title: HEAL Initiative: Preventing Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16–30) (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required
FOA Number: RFA-DA-19-035
Summary:

Many states across the country have experienced an increase in children involved in the foster care system because of young parental opioid and methamphetamine use disorders (OUD; MUD). The Families Actively Improving Relationships (FAIR) program is a recently developed, rigorously evaluated, intensive outpatient treatment program for parents involved in the child welfare system for parental OUD and/or MUD. The FAIR effectiveness trial showed the potential for FAIR to be adapted as a prevention program, and to be implemented in counties with low service availability and access. This project will adapt and implement FAIR for prevention in collaboration with Oregon State Department of Human Services (DHS). Across two counties, parents referred by DHS for OUD or MUD with risk for escalation will be recruited and randomized to receive the adapted FAIR as prevention, or standard case management and referral. Outcomes will inform further FAIR refinement and potential broader scale-up.

1K01DA044279-01A1
PREVENTING SUBSTANCE USE AMONG YOUTH: BEHAVIORAL AND ECONOMIC IMPACT OF ENHANCED IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES FOR COMMUNITIES New Strategies to Prevent and Treat Opioid Addiction Preventing Opioid Use Disorder NIDA University of Michigan Ann Arbor EISMAN, ANDRIA B Ann Arbor, MI 2019
FOA Title: Mentored Research Scientist Development Award (Parent K01)
FOA Number: PA-16-190
Summary:

Quality implementation of evidence-based programs (EBPs) in community settings for youth is critical for reducing the burden of alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATOD) use and its consequences. EBPs delivered in schools are an efficient way to reach large populations of young people, including those underserved by other settings, and reduce and prevent ATOD use. Yet youth rarely receive EBPs as intended in community settings, including schools. This training and research plan will prepare the investigator to become an independent scholar in the implementation of theories and frameworks to better understand factors related to program delivery—approaches to enhancing ATOD programs for youth in community settings. More specifically, the training will allow him to expand the application of Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to inform approaches to enhancing effective EBP delivery. The proposed training and research plan extends current implementation research to focus applying implementation theories, frameworks and strategies in other community settings (schools) and on economic evaluation of implementation strategies. The results are expected to improve current efforts to deliver EBPs in diverse community settings and aid in applying evidence-based implementation strategies in the school context to ultimately reduce and prevent ATOD use among youth.