Many research projects that advance the goals of the HEAL initiative cut across both pain management and addiction. HEAL funds research and supports collaborative efforts in these areas, which are also priorities for NIH and HEAL partner agencies. Topics will continue to expand as HEAL grows.

Research Programs

The NIH HEAL Initiative supports NIH Research Supplements to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (often called “diversity supplements”). Any HEAL researcher can apply to bring on a trainee (or early-stage faculty member) from an underrepresented minority group to further that trainee’s education and career development. The intent is to enhance diversity in the HEAL workforce from a range of characteristics, including not only race and ethnicity, but also gender, economic/class background, disability, and other features that characterize individuals underrepresented in the biomedical, clinical, behavioral, and social sciences.

The NIH HEAL Initiative supports NIH Research Supplements to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (often called “diversity supplements”). Any HEAL researcher can apply to bring on a trainee (or early-stage faculty member) from an underrepresented minority group to further that trainee’s education and career development. The intent is to enhance diversity in the HEAL workforce from a range of characteristics, including not only race and ethnicity, but also gender, economic/class background, disability, and other features that characterize individuals underrepresented in the biomedical, clinical, behavioral, and social sciences.

The NIH HEAL Initiative is providing funding to address challenges related to meaningful engagement of populations experiencing pain and opioid use disorder in HEAL clinical studies. These efforts are developed in the context of individual studies, settings, and patient populations to enhance engagement of patients, communities, and other stakeholders; and to improve recruitment, retention, and inclusion of participants from racial and ethnic minority populations.